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Beverly Hills News – The Winners: Academy Award Nominees 2018

Updated: Sunday, March 4, 2018 – 8:53 PM

Here is a complete list of winners of the 90th Oscars, which were presented Sunday evening at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood:

Best Picture

— “The Shape of Water,” Guillermo del Toro and J. Miles Dale

Lead Actor

— Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour”

Lead Actress

— Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Supporting Actor

— Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Supporting Actress

— Allison Janney, “I, Tonya”

Director

— “The Shape of Water,” Guillermo del Toro

Animated Feature

— “Coco,” Lee Unkrich, Darla K. Anderson

Animated Short

— “Dear Basketball,” Glen Keane, Kobe Bryant

Adapted Screenplay

— “Call Me by Your Name,” James Ivory

Original Screenplay

— “Get Out,” Jordan Peele

Cinematography

— “Blade Runner 2049,” Roger Deakins

Best Documentary Feature

— “Icarus,” Bryan Fogel, Dan Cogan

Best Documentary Short Subject

— “Heaven is a Traffic Jam on the 405,” Frank Stiefel

Best Live Action Short Film

— “The Silent Child,” Chris Overton, Rachel Shenton

Best Foreign Language Film

— “A Fantastic Woman” (Chile)

Film Editing

— “Dunkirk,” Lee Smith

Sound Editing

— “Dunkirk,” Alex Gibson, Richard King

Sound Mixing

— “Dunkirk,” Mark Weingarten, Gregg Landaker, Gary A. Rizzo

Production Design

— “The Shape of Water,” Paul D. Austerberry, Jeffrey A. Melvin, Shane Vieau

Original Score

— “The Shape of Water,” Alexandre Desplat

Original Song

— “Remember Me” from “Coco,” Kristen Anderson-Lopez, Robert Lopez

Makeup and Hair

— “Darkest Hour,” Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski, Lucy Sibbick

Costume Design

— “Phantom Thread,” Mark Bridges

Visual Effects

— “Blade Runner 2049,” John Nelson, Paul Lambert, Richard R. Hoover, Gerd Nefzer

CNS-03-04-2018 20:47

 

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Updated: Sunday, March 4, 2018 – 7:19 PM

 (CNS) – The 90th Academy Awards began as predicted Sunday evening, with Sam Rockwell winning the prize for best supporting actor for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” and Allison Janney being named best supporting actress for “I, Tonya.”

For the 49-year-old Rockwell, the win for his portrayal of a police officer in the crime drama was the first Oscar of his career, on his first nomination.

In an exuberant acceptance speech at the Dolby Theatre, he thanked his parents for their love of movies that was passed on to him. He said when he was 9 years old he was called into the principal’s office at school, only to find his father there, telling him they had to go see his grandmother.

“I got in the car and I said, `What’s wrong with grandma?’ and he said, `Nothing. We’re going to the movies,”‘ Rockwell said.

He hailed all of his castmates in “Three Billboards,” and gave high praise to writer-director Martin McDonagh.

“Martin McDonagh, I wouldn’t be standing here if it wasn’t for you,” he said. “I want to do 10 other movies with you.”

Rockwell had already won Golden Globe, Critics’ Choice and Screen Actors Guild awards for his work in the film.

Janney, 58, did the same, and she carried that success into Oscar night.

“I did it all by myself,” she joked as she took the stage to accept the honor. “Ok, nothing further from the truth.”

She also hailed her cast and gave praise to her friend, screenwriter Steven Rogers, who has said he wrote the role of Harding’s mother with Janney in mind.

“Steven Rogers, look what you did,” Janney said. “Look what you did. You’re a brilliant writer. Thank you for the gift of LaVona. I did not see this coming, you did. You give new meaning to the word `friend.”‘

Janney also gave a shout-out to Joanne Woodward, who mentored her early in her career, thanking her for “your encouragement and generosity that gave me the confidence to think I could pursue a career in acting.”

She concluded her speech by dedicating the award to her brother, Hal, who suffered from addiction and depression and committed suicide in 2011.

“This is for you, Hal,” she said. “You’re always in my heart.”

Disney/Pixar’s “Coco” won the Oscar for best animated film, while Chile’s “A Fantastic Woman” was named best foreign language film.

Retired Los Angeles Lakers star Kobe Bryant added an Oscar to his collection of career accolades, winning the prize for best animated short along with Glen Keane for “Dear Basketball,” a dramatization of Bryant’s retirement announcement.

The trio of Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski and Lucy Sibbick won the prize for makeup and hairstyling for their work on “Darkest Hour,” transforming Oldman into British Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

Mark Bridges won his second career Oscar for costume design for “Phantom Thread.” He previously won in the category for “The Artist.” The Oscar for documentary feature went to “Icarus,” a probing look at doping by Russian athletes.

Director Christopher Nolan’s war epic “Dunkirk” swept the sound categories, with Alex Gibson and Richard King winning for sound editing and Mark Weingarten, Gregg Landaker and Gary Rizzo winning for sound mixing. The film also won for film editing by Lee Smith.

“The Shape of Water,” the night’s top nominee with 13, won an early prize for production design for production designer Paul Austerberry and set decorators Jeffrey Melvin and Shane Vieau.

The visual effects Oscar went to the team from “Blade Runner 2049” — John Nelson, Paul Lambert, Richard R. Hoover and Gerd Nefzer.

Opening the ceremony, host Jimmy Kimmel didn’t shy away from jokes about the mix-up at last year’s ceremony, when “La La Land” was mistakenly announced as winner of the best picture Oscar, which actually went to “Moonlight.”

Talking to the star-studded audience in his opening monologue, Kimmel joked, “When you hear your name called, don’t get up right away.”

While the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences took several behind-the-scenes steps to prevent another error, including banning electronic devices backstage. But another measure that was obvious to viewers was the envelopes containing the names of the winners. The envelopes were black with bold gold lettering to ensure the presenters had the right one for the right category.

Kimmel also addressed the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements against sexual harassment and inequality, including a nervously received quip about disgraced producer Harvey Weinstein, who was thrown out of the Academy last year in light of the sexual harassment and assault allegations against him.

But Kimmel tried to keep the mood upbeat, saying, “Things are changing for the better. It’s a positive change. This is a night for positivity.”

CNS-03-04-2018 19:11

Posted: Sunday, March 4, 2018 – 2:28 PM

(CNS) – Producers of Sunday evening’s 90th Oscars are likely hoping for a much less dramatic end to the event than last year, when the wrong film was announced as the best-picture winner, but that category is ironically the one generating the most drama this year.

Most pundits have narrowed the best-picture race to a two-horse sprint between Guillermo del Toro’s fantasy romance “The Shape of Water” — the top nominee with 13 — and Martin McDonagh’s crime drama “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

“Shape of Water” appears to have the upper hand, having already collected the usually prophetic Producers Guild of America Award, although the winner of that honor the past two years has failed to win the top Oscar. Del Toro also won the Directors Guild of America Award, making him the front-runner in the Oscar directing category, while McDonagh didn’t even earn an Academy Award nomination for directing “Three Billboards.”

Some Hollywood crystal-ball-gazers have suggested the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ voting system of ranking the best-picture nominees might open the door for an underdog to slip into winner’s envelope. Other films in the category are “Call Me By Your Name,” “Darkest Hour,” “Dunkirk,” “Get Out,” “Lady Bird,” “Phantom Thread” and “The Post.”

So while the final award of the night will provide some excitement, the acting awards aren’t likely to.

Gary Oldman is widely expected to take home the best actor prize for his role as British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in the wartime drama “Darkest Hour,” while Frances McDormand is considered a lock for best actress for her turn as the mother of a murdered daughter in “Three Billboards.”

Sam Rockwell and Allison Janney are also heavy favorites for their supporting roles — Rockwell as a police officer in “Three Billboards” and Janney as figure skater Tonya Harding’s abusive mother in “I, Tonya.”

Oldman, McDormand, Rockwell and Janney made clean sweeps of the major pre-Oscar awards, including the Golden Globes, Critics Choice and Screen Actors Guild honors, so they’re unlikely to go home empty-handed Sunday night — but not for a lack of formidable competition.

Oldman is in a powerhouse field of nominees, led by past winners Daniel Day-Lewis for “Phantom Thread” and Denzel Washington for “Roman J. Israel, Esq.” Newcomers Timothee Chalamet of “Call Me by Your Name” and Daniel Kaluuya of “Get Out” round out the category.

Day-Lewis is a three-time Oscar winner for “My Left Foot,” “There Will Be Blood” and “Lincoln,” while Washington is a nine-time nominee and two-time winner, for his lead role in “Training Day” and supporting work in “Glory.”

McDormand, who previously won a best-actress Oscar for “Fargo,” is competing with Sally Hawkins of “The Shape of Water,” Margot Robbie for “I, Tonya,” Saoirse Ronan of “Lady Bird” and Oscar history-maker Meryl Streep for “The Post.”

Streep’s nomination is the 21st of her career, and the 17th as best actress, extending her lead as the performer with the most career Oscar nominations. She previously won best actress for “Sophie’s Choice” and “The Iron Lady,” and for supporting work in “Kramer vs. Kramer.”

Janney will be challenged for supporting-actress honors by Mary J. Blige for “Mudbound,” Lesley Manville for “Phantom Thread,” Laurie Metcalf for “Lady Bird” and Octavia Spencer for “The Shape of Water.”

Rockwell leads a supporting-actor category that also features Willem Dafoe of “The Florida Project,” Woody Harrelson of “Three Billboards,” Richard Jenkins for “The Shape of Water” and Christopher Plummer for “All the Money in the World.”

Plummer was a late addition to the film, replacing Kevin Spacey, who was removed from the movie following allegations of sexual misconduct. At 88 years old, Plummer holds the record for the oldest acting nominee. He is also the oldest person to win an acting Oscar, earning a supporting-actor honor for “Beginners” at age 82.

The DGA win makes del Toro a front-runner for best director for “The Shape of Water.” Also vying for the prize are Christopher Nolan for “Dunkirk,” Jordan Peele for “Get Out,” Greta Gerwig for “Lady Bird” and Paul Thomas Anderson for “Phantom Thread.”

McDonagh was a notable snub in the directing category, although he is nominated for best original screenplay for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.” Peele and Gerwig are also nominated for original screenplay, while del Toro is nominated along with Vanessa Taylor for “The Shape of Water.” Emily Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani round out the original screenplay category for penning “The Big Sick.”

“The Shape of Water” also has nominations for cinematography, costume design, film editing, original score, production design, sound editing and sound mixing.

“Dunkirk” has eight total nominations, followed by “Three Billboards” with seven and “Darkest Hour” and “Phantom Thread” with six each.

Jimmy Kimmel will return to host the Oscar ceremony at the Dolby Theatre for the second year in a row. He received high marks for his freshman hosting effort last year, highlighted by his casual handling of the end-of- ceremony flub that saw presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway announcing “La La Land” as the winner of the best picture Oscar, when the prize actually went to “Moonlight.”

The turmoil led to an investigation that primarily laid blame for the snafu on a PricewaterhouseCoopers partner, Brian Cullinan, who handed Beatty the wrong winner’s envelope backstage. Officials noted that Cullinan was frequently on his cell phone backstage, even snapping a photo of best-actress winner Emma Stone as she walked off stage — around the time he should have been handing the best-picture envelope to Beatty.

Cullinan won’t be back this year, and the Academy has banned “electronic devices” backstage to ensure there are no more distraction- related foul-ups.

For people looking for a little more drama on stage Sunday night, there are a few things to watch:

— Retired Laker star Kobe Bryant is nominated for an Oscar in the best animated short category for “Dear Basketball,” a dramatization of his retirement announcement.

— Rachel Morrison is the first woman ever nominated for the Oscar for best cinematography for her work on “Mudbound,” so she could break another glass ceiling with a win. But she is faced with formidable competition, most notably from Roger Deakins, a sentimental favorite whose nomination for “Blade Runner 2049” is the 14th of his career, but he has never won.

— Regardless of whether he wins the original score prize for “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” composer John Williams’ appearance at the ceremony pads his already history-making impact on the film world. The nomination is the 51st of his career, second only to Walt Disney’s 59. Williams holds the record for original-score nominations with 46. His other five nods were for original song.

Here is a complete list of nominations for the 90th Oscars, which will be presented Sunday evening at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood:

Best Picture

— “Call Me by Your Name,” Peter Spears, Luca Guadagnino, Emilie Georges and Marco Morabito

— “Darkest Hour,” Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Lisa Bruce, Anthony McCarten and Douglas Urbanski

— “Dunkirk,” Emma Thomas and Christopher Nolan

— “Get Out,” Sean McKittrick, Jason Blum, Edward H. Hamm Jr. and Jordan Peele

— “Lady Bird,” Scott Rudin, Eli Bush and Evelyn O’Neill

— “Phantom Thread,” JoAnne Sellar, Paul Thomas Anderson, Megan Ellison and Daniel Lupi

— “The Post,” Amy Pascal, Steven Spielberg and Kristie Macosko Krieger

— “The Shape of Water,” Guillermo del Toro and J. Miles Dale

— “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin and Martin McDonagh

Lead Actor

— Timothee Chalamet, “Call Me by Your Name”

— Daniel Day-Lewis, “Phantom Thread”

— Daniel Kaluuya, “Get Out”

— Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour”

— Denzel Washington, “Roman J. Israel, Esq.”

Lead Actress

— Sally Hawkins, “The Shape of Water”

— Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

— Margot Robbie, “I, Tonya”

— Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”

— Meryl Streep, “The Post”

Supporting Actor

— Willem Dafoe, “The Florida Project”

— Woody Harrelson, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

— Richard Jenkins, “The Shape of Water”

— Christopher Plummer, “All the Money in the World”

— Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Supporting Actress

— Mary J. Blige, “Mudbound”

— Allison Janney, “I, Tonya”

— Lesley Manville, “Phantom Thread”

— Laurie Metcalf, “Lady Bird”

— Octavia Spencer, “The Shape of Water”

Director

— “Dunkirk,” Christopher Nolan

— “Get Out,” Jordan Peele

— “Lady Bird,” Greta Gerwig

— “Phantom Thread,” Paul Thomas Anderson

— “The Shape of Water,” Guillermo del Toro

Animated Feature

— “The Boss Baby,” Tom McGrath, Ramsey Ann Naito

— “The Breadwinner,” Nora Twomey, Anthony Leo

— “Coco,” Lee Unkrich, Darla K. Anderson

— “Ferdinand,” Carlos Saldanha

— “Loving Vincent,” Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman, Sean Bobbitt, Ivan Mactaggart, Hugh Welchman

Animated Short

— “Dear Basketball,” Glen Keane, Kobe Bryant

— “Garden Party,” Victor Caire, Gabriel Grapperon

— “Lou,” Dave Mullins, Dana Murray

— “Negative Space,” Max Porter, Ru Kuwahata

— “Revolting Rhymes,” Jakob Schuh, Jan Lachauer

Adapted Screenplay

— “Call Me by Your Name,” James Ivory

— “The Disaster Artist,” Scott Neustadter & Michael H. Weber

— “Logan,” Scott Frank & James Mangold and Michael Green

— “Molly’s Game,” Aaron Sorkin

— “Mudbound,” Virgil Williams and Dee Rees

Original Screenplay

— “The Big Sick,” Emily V. Gordon & Kumail Nanjiani

— “Get Out,” Jordan Peele

— “Lady Bird,” Greta Gerwig

— “The Shape of Water,” Guillermo del Toro, Vanessa Taylor

— “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” Martin McDonagh

Cinematography

— “Blade Runner 2049,” Roger Deakins

— “Darkest Hour,” Bruno Delbonnel

— “Dunkirk,” Hoyte van Hoytema

— “Mudbound,” Rachel Morrison

— “The Shape of Water,” Dan Laustsen

Best Documentary Feature

— “Abacus: Small Enough to Jail,” Steve James, Mark Mitten, Julie Goldman

— “Faces Places,” Agnes Varda, JR, Rosalie Varda

— “Icarus,” Bryan Fogel, Dan Cogan

— “Last Men in Aleppo,” Feras Fayyad, Kareem Abeed, Soren Steen Jepersen

— “Strong Island,” Yance Ford, Joslyn Barnes

Best Documentary Short Subject

— “Edith+Eddie,” Laura Checkoway, Thomas Lee Wright

— “Heaven is a Traffic Jam on the 405,” Frank Stiefel

— “Heroin(e),” Elaine McMillion Sheldon, Kerrin Sheldon

— “Knife Skills,” Thomas Lennon

— “Traffic Stop,” Kate Davis, David Heilbroner

Best Live Action Short Film

— “DeKalb Elementary,” Reed Van Dyk

— “The Eleven O’Clock,” Derin Seale, Josh Lawson

— “My Nephew Emmett,” Kevin Wilson, Jr.

— “The Silent Child,” Chris Overton, Rachel Shenton

— “Watu Wote/All of Us,” Katja Benrath, Tobias Rosen

Best Foreign Language Film

— “A Fantastic Woman” (Chile)

— “The Insult” (Lebanon)

— “Loveless” (Russia)

— “On Body and Soul (Hungary)

— “The Square” (Sweden)

Film Editing

— “Baby Driver,” Jonathan Amos, Paul Machliss

— “Dunkirk,” Lee Smith

— “I, Tonya,” Tatiana S. Riegel

— “The Shape of Water,” Sidney Wolinsky

— “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” Jon Gregory

Sound Editing

— “Baby Driver,” Julian Slater

— “Blade Runner 2049,” Mark Mangini, Theo Green

— “Dunkirk,” Alex Gibson, Richard King

— “The Shape of Water,” Nathan Robitaille, Nelson Ferreira

— “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” Ren Klyce, Matthew Wood

Sound Mixing

— “Baby Driver,” Mary H. Ellis, Julian Slater, Tim Cavagin

— “Blade Runner 2049,” Mac Ruth, Ron Bartlett, Doug Hephill

— “Dunkirk,” Mark Weingarten, Gregg Landaker, Gary A. Rizzo

— “The Shape of Water,” Glen Gauthier, Christian Cooke, Brad Zoern

— “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” Stuart Wilson, Ren Klyce, David Parker, Michael Semanick

Production Design

— “Beauty and the Beast,” Sarah Greenwood; Katie Spencer

— “Blade Runner 2049,” Dennis Gassner, Alessandra Querzola

— “Darkest Hour,” Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer

— “Dunkirk,” Nathan Crowley, Gary Fettis

— “The Shape of Water,” Paul D. Austerberry, Jeffrey A. Melvin, Shane Vieau

Original Score

— “Dunkirk,” Hans Zimmer

— “Phantom Thread,” Jonny Greenwood

— “The Shape of Water,” Alexandre Desplat

— “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” John Williams

— “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” Carter Burwell

Original Song

— “Mighty River” from “Mudbound,” Mary J. Blige

— “Mystery of Love” from “Call Me by Your Name,” Sufjan Stevens

— “Remember Me” from “Coco,” Kristen Anderson-Lopez, Robert Lopez

— “Stand Up for Something” from “Marshall,” Diane Warren, Common

— “This Is Me” from “The Greatest Showman,” Benj Pasek, Justin Paul

Makeup and Hair

— “Darkest Hour,” Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski, Lucy Sibbick

— “Victoria and Abdul,” Daniel Phillips and Lou Sheppard

— “Wonder,” Arjen Tuiten

Costume Design

— “Beauty and the Beast,” Jacqueline Durran

— “Darkest Hour,” Jacqueline Durran

— “Phantom Thread,” Mark Bridges

— “The Shape of Water,” Luis Sequeira

— “Victoria and Abdul,” Consolata Boyle

Visual Effects

— “Blade Runner 2049,” John Nelson, Paul Lambert, Richard R. Hoover, Gerd Nefzer

— “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” Christopher Townsend, Guy Williams, Jonathan Fawkner, Dan Sudick

— “Kong: Skull Island,” Stephen Rosenbaum, Jeff White, Scott Benza, Mike Meinardus

— “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,”  Ben Morris, Mike Mulholland, Chris Corbould, Neal Scanlon

— “War for the Planet of the Apes,” Joe Letteri, Dan Lemmon, Daniel Barrett, Joel Whist

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