Beverly Hills News – It’s Election Day and Voters are Lining Up to Cast Their Ballots | BH Courier

Beverly Hills News – It’s Election Day and Voters are Lining Up to Cast Their Ballots

Voters line up to vote on Lasky Drive before polls open
Voters waited over 45 minutes this morning at the Lutheran Church on South Beverly Drive

Updated: Tuesday, November 8, 2016 – 1:15 PM

(CNS) – About 9.7 percent of the 5.19 million registered voters in Los Angeles County had cast ballots as of 9 a.m. Tuesday, according to the county Registrar-Recorder’s Office.

By comparison, 16.4 percent of those eligible to vote in the county had done so as of 9 a.m. in the 2008 presidential election, with  11.9 percent voting as of 9 a.m. in 2012, according to the registrar’s office.

In the 2012 presidential election, 70.46 percent of the county’s 4,593,621 registered voters cast ballots, according to the office, down from the 81.92 percent of registered voters who weighed in during the 2008 election, which resulted in Barack Obama becoming the nation’s first African American president.

Lines have been long at some polling stations, partly due to the length of time needed to fill out a ballot. There are 35 contests listed on ballots in some precincts.

An average time of between 10 minutes and 11 minutes was expected to fill out such ballots, which could result in long lines, the registrar’s office warned earlier.

An office spokeswoman said no major problems have been reported as of 11 a.m.

“We’ve had some minor problems, which is very typical,” she said. “We have trouble-shooters in the field assigned to (various) polling stations.”

Voters at one polling station in Van Nuys arrived to find no voting machines in place, KNX Radio reported. When that problem was corrected, another problem developed — a malfunctioning machine that collects the ballots. A technician fixed that problem, according to the station.

The county’s 4,523 polls opened at 7 a.m. and will close at 8 p.m.

Posted: Tuesday, November 8, 2016 – 8:32 AM

The hotly contested race for the White House, a bevy of state ballot measures and the City’s own measures makes this one of the most hard-fought campaign years in decades, and voters lined up outside polling places to cast their ballots in Beverly Hills.

The Courier has the following endorsements:

Measure HH, the Hilton Initiative: YES

In addition to a 26-story building at the City’s gateway, “yes on HH” means a new 1.7-acre garden that will be open to the public (the covenant has been recorded by the County of Los Angeles) and will bring $33 million in additional revenue on top of the previously guaranteed development fees, bringing the City $1.1 billion in 30 years.

Measure M (Metro transportation sales tax): NO

Even Metro admits this is a “forever tax.” We cannot support bureaucracy that is self-sustaining for its own purpose. Measure M creates an approximately$860 million annual tax bill for transportation projects that we may never see come to fruition in our lifetime.

Measure Y (School building bond): YES

Beverly Hills schools are in desperate need of renovation and a “yes on Measure Y” ensures that our children are learning in the safest, most modern schools.

LA County Supervisor: District 5: Kathryn Barger 

Superior Court Judges:
Office #11 Stephen Schreiner;
Office #42: Efrain Matthew Aceves;
Office #84: Susan Jung Townsend;
Office # 158: David A. Berger

Proposition 53: revenue bond approval – YES
Proposition 56: tobacco tax increase – NO
Proposition 57: parole for non-violent criminals – NO
Proposition 58: bilingual public education – NO
Proposition 62: repealing the death penalty – NO
Proposition 63: ammo background checks – NO
Proposition 64: marihuana legalization – NO
Proposition 66: death penalty acceleration – YES
Proposition 67: plastic bag referendum – NO
Measure A: parcel tax for parks – NO
Measure FF: taxing hillside land parcels – NO
Measure GG: taxing A parcel tax for Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority – NO
Measure HHH: L.A. homeless housing bond – NO

For detailed information on these measures and propositions, and on the candidates, see your voter pamphlet or visit ballotopedia.

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