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Train wreck? Michigan Right-to-Work supporters look to expand RTW to include lawyers

featured_State_bar_sign_8341

featured_State_bar_sign_8341As Ohio union supporters watch in horror as Michigan’s Right-to-Work backers look to expand the boundaries of the law to include attorneys and bar fees, their resolve to strike down Right-to Work laws at home has only strengthened.

“It’s clear that Right-to-Work supporters are going to continue to push new boundaries every chance they get,” said Pat Sink, IUOE Local 18’s business manager. “That’s why it’s vital that we don’t surrender an inch in this fight.”

According to the “Lansing State Journal,” Greg McNeilly, one of Michigan’s leading Right-to-Work supporters, has called for legislation to repeal the law that requires lawyers to pay fees to the Michigan Bar.  

Claiming to be in talks with potential sponsors, McNeilly said during a panel discussion of the Right-to-Work law that he’s hoping to help introduce a bill that would make state bar membership optional.

“They’ve become an irrelevant organization,” said McNeilly, head of the Right-to-Work advocacy group, Michigan Freedom Fund. “They’re out there pursuing ridiculous solutions for which there is no problem and using their members’ conscripted money to do that.”

With this new development, Ohio labor supporters are growing increasingly agitated by Right-to-Work supporters and their continued expansion into new territories. Although the unions have been thus far successful at keeping Right to Work efforts in Ohio at bay, officials have remained vigilant in their efforts to ensure the movement doesn’t gain any traction.

Michigan has long been an example of what is at stake in the Right-to-Work fight. After initially failing to keep Right-to-Work legislation off the ballot, state labor groups have been continually on the defensive when it comes to expanding Right-to-Work legislation, most recently in July when the Michigan Supreme court refused to intervene on their behalf.

“It’s looking more and more like Right-to-Work can and will turn into a runaway train once enacted,” said Sink. “It’s up to us to avoid the inevitable train wreck and stop the movement in its tracks.”

Opponents of recent Right to Work bills, also known as “Workplace Freedom,” contend that the initiative’s true purpose is to kill unions and worker protections, ultimately leading to a weaker middle class.

By stripping workers of their rights and freedoms, business owners would be free to lower worker pay, reduce worker benefits and ignore worker rights.

To keep voters well informed on the dangers of Right-to-Work, the IUOE Local 18 union-backed advocacy group Keep Ohio’s Heritage has been running ads on cable and network television designed to educate voters on the issue.

Train wreck? Michigan Right-to-Work supporters look to expand RTW to include lawyers

featured_State_bar_sign_8341

featured_State_bar_sign_8341As Ohio union supporters watch in horror as Michigan’s Right-to-Work backers look to expand the boundaries of the law to include attorneys and bar fees, their resolve to strike down Right-to Work laws at home has only strengthened.

“It’s clear that Right-to-Work supporters are going to continue to push new boundaries every chance they get,” said Pat Sink, IUOE Local 18’s business manager. “That’s why it’s vital that we don’t surrender an inch in this fight.”

According to the “Lansing State Journal,” Greg McNeilly, one of Michigan’s leading Right-to-Work supporters, has called for legislation to repeal the law that requires lawyers to pay fees to the Michigan Bar.  

Claiming to be in talks with potential sponsors, McNeilly said during a panel discussion of the Right-to-Work law that he’s hoping to help introduce a bill that would make state bar membership optional.

“They’ve become an irrelevant organization,” said McNeilly, head of the Right-to-Work advocacy group, Michigan Freedom Fund. “They’re out there pursuing ridiculous solutions for which there is no problem and using their members’ conscripted money to do that.”

With this new development, Ohio labor supporters are growing increasingly agitated by Right-to-Work supporters and their continued expansion into new territories. Although the unions have been thus far successful at keeping Right to Work efforts in Ohio at bay, officials have remained vigilant in their efforts to ensure the movement doesn’t gain any traction.

Michigan has long been an example of what is at stake in the Right-to-Work fight. After initially failing to keep Right-to-Work legislation off the ballot, state labor groups have been continually on the defensive when it comes to expanding Right-to-Work legislation, most recently in July when the Michigan Supreme court refused to intervene on their behalf.

“It’s looking more and more like Right-to-Work can and will turn into a runaway train once enacted,” said Sink. “It’s up to us to avoid the inevitable train wreck and stop the movement in its tracks.”

Opponents of recent Right to Work bills, also known as “Workplace Freedom,” contend that the initiative’s true purpose is to kill unions and worker protections, ultimately leading to a weaker middle class.

By stripping workers of their rights and freedoms, business owners would be free to lower worker pay, reduce worker benefits and ignore worker rights.

To keep voters well informed on the dangers of Right-to-Work, the IUOE Local 18 union-backed advocacy group Keep Ohio’s Heritage has been running ads on cable and network television designed to educate voters on the issue.

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